Why listening is critical in EBI

By: Dr. Cheri Shapiro

As a provider, when it comes to deciding on a treatment course for children or adolescents, as with treating adults, we need to pay very careful attention to assessing what is actually happening for those seeking our care.  This means listening carefully to what children and adolescents tell us directly, but critically, also listening to those that care for these young people.

Parents and caregivers are in the best position to observe and describe behaviors that they see in youth in their care. Simply put, we cannot adequately understand challenges faced by youth without caregiver input. Educators also play an important role in helping us understand whether a child or adolescent’s behavior is typical or not.  Just think, most second-grade teachers, in just a few years, may interact with nearly 75-100 second grade children! This allows educators to develop a good understanding of what behaviors most second grade children do or do not exhibit.

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Challenges of EBI for foster children

By: Dr. Cheri Shapiro

An important question for behavioral health providers and organizations considering evidence-based approaches for children, youth, and families involves the population being served. One important group of youth that are at high risk for a range of poor outcomes are youth in the foster care system. Importantly, children and adolescents in the foster care system are often burdened by trauma, or unresolved grief and loss (for example, see work by Dr. Monique Mitchell) that cannot be ignored.

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What do power outages and EBI have in common?

By: Dr. Cheri Shapiro

Many of you heard about the debacle in Atlanta at the airport caused by a power outage on December 17, 2017.  I had the unfortunate opportunity of being involved; travel plans took me through Atlanta, landing just as the entire airport operations came to a dead stop.

What does this have to do with evidence-based behavioral health interventions for children, youth, and families?

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Tackling common intervention challenges

By: Dr. Cheri Shapiro

As a behavioral health provider, you know that delivering programs in the real world is one of the most rewarding and difficult jobs we can do.  Every client and family is unique, and clients we serve do not often fit within a specific category of problem area.  A common challenge faced by providers in delivering evidence-based interventions is difficulty tailoring interventions to fit with our clients’ needs and preferences.  Another common problem, that occurs regardless of intervention approach, is how to manage problems that arise during the course of treatment.

As wise friend has said many times, “stick with the plan.”  So how does this apply to delivering therapeutic services?

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Why tracking client progress is critical

By: Dr. Cheri Shapiro

One important consideration in delivering interventions, especially for evidence-based interventions, is tracking of client outcomes. Tracking client progress is critical. We need to know where youth and families are at the start of an intervention so we can determine if progress is being made toward family goals. This can help us stay on course, or to make corrections if problems do not change or become worse. Gathering data at the end of an intervention can help us verify that we have met our goals.

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Why is “fidelity” important in Evidence-Based Treatment?

By: Dr. Cheri Shapiro

One common question often asked by treatment providers and organizations about evidence-based interventions involves program fidelity.  Treatment integrity or fidelity refers to implementing an intervention in the way that it was intended to be delivered. This means not adding or deleting program elements, and not creating combinations of programs or program elements.

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